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First things first, let’s get the wheel off the bike.  Just like fixing the flat, there is a preferred method to removing the wheel that make the process go smoother and quicker.

Rear Wheel

Keep your bike upright and shift into the smallest cog, open up the brakes using either the quick release mechanism or by releasing the v-brake.  Open up the rear skewer via the quick release lever.  Hold the bike with one hand, lift the bike off the ground, grab the wheel and gently guide the wheel out from the bike.

Front Wheel

Open up the brakes using either the quick release mechanism or by releasing the v-brake.  With one hand hold the bike firmly from the handlebar or the stem and the lift the bike off the ground.  With the other hand gently guide the wheel out of the fork.

Now Let’s Fix the flat

1. Take your time – do not rush. A mistake can cost you more time, and damage your spare tube.

2. Completely deflate the tube.

3. Use tire levers to pry one bead off the rim until you can remove the tube by hand.

4. If you intend to patch the tube, be careful not to pinch it during the removal process.

5. Carefully work your fingers around the inside of the tire to find and remove the flat causing debris.*
With folding tires, you can turn the tire inside out to facilitate your search

6. Make sure that the Rimstrip is in place and is covering all of the nipple holes.

7. Put a slight amount of air into the new or patched tube, evening out the wrinkles and/or folds.

8. Insert the tube into the tire, placing the valve at the tires label, so you will have a reference point for future flats. You want to know if you are getting flats in the same spot. This would indicate that you either missed the debris or you have a rim problem.

9. Insert the valve in the rim and mount one tire bead.

10. Make sure the tube remains inside the tire.

11. Start at the valve and work the other bead into the rim.

12. Make sure that the tube is not “pinched / wedged between the tire bead and the rim” anywhere along the rim.

13. The valve should create a 90 degree angle with the rim.

14. If you need to use a tire lever to position the tire bead onto the rim, be very careful not the pinch the tube.

15. Inflate the tire; and check again to see if the tube is pinched.

Now Let’s Put Your Wheel Back on Your Bike

Rear

With the quick release level opposite the chain side, place the wheel in the dropouts, line up the wheel so the chain falls on the smallest cog, with a hand on each side of the skewer pull the wheel until it is fully engaged in the dropouts and centered.  Then “lock” the skewer. Close the brakes, lift the wheel off the ground and spin the wheel.  If it gooks centered and does not rub against the brake pads you are done.  If it rubs against the pads release the QR lever and re-center the wheel and re-lock the skewer.  Check again and if correct, continue on your ride.

Front

 Lift the fork, place the wheel between the fork blades and gently guide the skewer into the group outs.  Center the wheel and use the lever to “lock” the skewer.  Close the brakes, lift the wheel off the ground and spin the wheel.  If it gooks centered and does not rub against the brake pads you are done.  If it rubs against the pads release the QR lever and re-center the wheel and re-lock the skewer.  Check again and if correct, continue on your ride.

* By examining the tube, you can often find the location of the flat.
By comparing that location of the hole on the tube to the tire, using your reference point, you can more easily locate any thorn, wire, glass, etc that remains in the tire.

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© (Descriptions/not image) Bike Highway; Uncle Barn’s Cue Sheet Exchange LLC, 2014 and prior year